Abandonment

I DNF’d on the Boston 400k this past weekend. A lingering stomach bug crippled my morning, as my average speed dropped and dropped along with my caloric intake. I logged about 100 miles before pulling the plug, and added another 20 or so to make it to a safe and easy to reach retrieval point.

Foggy, misty morning.

Foggy, misty morning.

Thanks to the NERds for putting on what looks to be a great ride. The first half of the route was gorgeous, and aside from it being ‘Bike Week’ (loud motors, not muscles) my morning was as pleasant as could be, under the circumstances. Despite the cramping, needing to ride bolt upright for long stretches, and touring the interiors of numerous restrooms and port-a-lets – I tried to enjoy my father’s day weekend ride.

A stone building in New Hampshire.

A stone building in New Hampshire.

Paint drippings - for better than 2 miles - my own bike lane.

Paint drippings - for better than 2 miles - my own bike lane.

Sounds... dirty.

Sounds... dirty.

'Bike Week' - ride organizers had ear plugs at the first control...

'Bike Week' - ride organizers had ear plugs at the first control...

A nice surprise was that the route passed 2 projects that I recently designed at The Nature of Things in Nashua, New Hampshire, one of which was assembled and raised just last week.

Timber frame addition, recently raised!

Timber frame addition, recently raised!

Timber frame school house (solar on the roof, geothermal heating and cooling, FSC certified timber... and a potential LEED certification!

Timber frame school house (solar on the roof, geothermal heating and cooling, FSC certified timber... and a potential LEED certification!

3 Responses to “Abandonment”

  1. Apertome says:

    Man, that’s a bummer. But, it happens. Kudos for sticking in there as long as you did. You still rode a longer ride than I’ve ever done.

    Regarding your comment on my blog, it would be cool to check out the ADKs. Not sure if I’ll have a chance to make it up there, but if I do, I might hit you up for some suggestions as to where to go.

  2. Chris Harvan says:

    It is too bad that the white trash on two wheeled lawnmowers would take the information about the earplugs and wear it like a badge of pride. Had wondered where you came up with an earplug when you first told me about it. I mean, I know you’re a Boy Scout and all, but who packs earplugs in their kit?

    I often fantasize about seeing Harley Tards wipe and losing loads of flesh to pavement in retribution for their offense to nature and everyone around them. Same thing with idiots on crotch rockets who do wheelies and weave in and out of traffic. Nothing bad ever happens to these knuckleheads that I have ever seen though.

    Sad part is, it is US on quiet, slow locomotion that rise more ire in the public than the noise litterers and those who actually create dangerous traffic situations. WE are somehow the threat that raises aggression in little old ladies and soccer moms and plain old douchebags.

    Truth is, if we were in trouble on the road, or went down, a good portion of those Harley Dudes would stop to help us because they consider us, brothers of some kind (the real Harley dudes, not the mid-life crisis ones). Maybe I don’t want anything to happen to them.

  3. Jim says:

    It must have been great to see your work on display a few times as you rode!

    No shame in abandoning that ride, as your engine room was a shambles. We must eat to ride!